Division Director: Michael Valente, PhD

Division of Adult Audiology

The Division of Adult Audiology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine is directed by Michael Valente, Ph.D., and includes eight additional audiologists: Alison Brockmeyer, Au.D., Diane Duddy, Au.D., Jennifer Listenberger, Au.D., Robert Mareing, Au.D., Kristi Oeding, Au.D., Amanda Ortmann, Ph.D., Judy Peterein, Au.D., and Steven Smith, Au.D.

Michael Valente received his Doctorate of Philosophy in Speech and Hearing Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1975. He is Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology and Director of Adult Audiology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine and has been in this role for over 25 years. Dr. Valente sees patients, teaches a graduate course on amplification in the Au.D. program at the Program of Audiology and Communication Sciences (PACS), administers the Division of Adult Audiology in the Department of Otolaryngology, and directs the Hearing Aid Research Laboratory.

Alison Brockmeyer received her Doctorate of Audiology from Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine in 2010. She then joined the Division of Adult Audiology shortly after graduation. Her primary clinical interests include amplification, hearing assistive technology, and diagnostic evaluation.

Diane Duddy received her Master of Science in Speech and Hearing from Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine in 1980 and then her Doctorate of Audiology from the George Osborne School of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania in 2006. She has been a clinical audiologist in the Division of Adult Audiology since 1995 and the supervisor of the Center for Advanced Medicine location since 2000. Her primary clinical interests include amplification, hearing assistive technology, tinnitus, hyperacusis,and misophonia.

Jennifer Listenberger received her Master of Arts in Audiology at Temple University in Pennsylvania in 1995 and then her Doctorate of Audiology from the George Osborne School of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania in 2009. Although she is a native of Philidelphia, Pennsylvania, she has been the supervisor of the Division of Adult Audiology at the West County location since 2002. Her primary clinical interest includes the advances of hearing aid technology and the benefits those advances offer patients with hearing loss.

Robert Mareing received his Master of Science in Speech and Hearing from Illinois State University in 1970 and then his Doctorate of Audiology from the George Osborne School of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania in 2003. He has been a clinical audiologist with the Division of Adult Audiology since 2009 and a lecturer for the PACS program since 2005. His primary clinical interests include amplification and hearing assistive technology.

Kristi Oeding received her Doctorate of Audiology from Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine in 2011 and joined the Division of Adult Audiology immediately after graduation. She sees patients clinically, but also participates in the daily research responsibilities of the Hearing Aid Research Laboratory. Her primary interests include amplification and tinnitus and hyperacusis retraining therapy.

Amanda Ortmann recently defended her dissertation, earning her Doctorate of Philosophy in Speech and Hearing Science in April 2012. She has been a clinical audiologist with the Division of Adult Audiology and a lecturer and clinical practicum coordinator for the PACS program since 2008. Her primary research and clinical interests include signal processing, speech perception, and aural rehabilitation.

Judy Peterein received her Master of Science in Audiology from Central Missouri State University in 1983 and then her Doctorate of Audiology from the George Osborne School of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania in 2009. She has been a clinical audiologist with the Division of Adult Audiology since 1983 and a lecturer in the PACS program since 2008. Her primary clinical interests include electrophysiologic testing, diagnostic evaluation, and amplification.

Steven Smith received his Master of Science in Speech and Hearing from Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine in 2002 and then his Doctorate of Audiology from the George Osborne School of Audiology at Salus University in Pennsylvania in 2007. He has been a clinical audiologist with the Division of Adult Audiology since 2009. His primary clinical interests include ototoxic monitoring, auditory processing, amplification, and hearing assistive technology.

In addition to their clinical and academic roles, the audiologists in the Division of Adult Audiology routinely participate in cutting edge research and share their knowledge through publications and presentations. Several full text articles published by the Audiology staff or through the Hearing Aid Research Laboratory can be found below.

Browse the Division of Adult Audiology Collections:

Publications